Development Management and Policy Program

Degree Requirements

Students in the M.A. in Development Management and Policy must complete eleven courses and, during the second year (third year in the case of part-time students), a Thesis Writing Seminar. This Seminar is intended to guide the students through the process of selecting a research topic, planning the research stages and drafting the manuscript. In addition to the Thesis Writing Seminar (DEVM 605, pass/fail), students are required to complete the following (note that course numbers and credits conform to Georgetown standards):

1. Core Courses (required)
  • DEVM 521 Comparative Social Policy (3 credits)
  • DEVM 524 Politics and Society in Latin America (3 credits)
  • DEVM 536 Policy: Theory and Methods (3 credits)
  • DEVM 548 Market, Society and State (3 credits)
2. Methodology Courses (required)
  • DEVM 511 Research Methodology (3 credits)
  • DEVM 512 Methodology of Public Policy Analysis (3 credits)
  • DEVM 605 Thesis Seminar I and II (3 credits each)
3. Elective Courses (5 required, offerings vary by year)
  • Environment and Politics (3 credits)
  • Development Studies (3 credits)
  • Global Political Economy (3 credits)
  • Democracy, Governance and Governability (3 credits)
  • Comparative Economic Policy (3 credits)
  • International Cooperation (3 credits)
  • Education Policy (3 credits)
Academic Performance

Grades for graduate course work will be recorded as follows:

Grade Grade Quality Points at GU Equivalent Points at UNSAM
A 4.0 / 4.0 10.0 / 10.0
A- 3.67 / 4.0 9.0 / 10.0
B+ 3.33 / 4.0 8.0 / 10.0
B 3.0 / 4.0 7.0 / 10.0
B- 2.67 / 4.0 6.0 / 10.0
C 2.0 / 4.0 4.0 / 10.0
F 0.0 / 4.0 0.0 / 10.0

 

 I Incomplete
 S Satisfactory (for pass/fail courses)
 U Unatisfactory (for pass/fail courses)
 IP In progress
 NR No Grade Reported

A Quality Point Index (QPI) of at least 3.0on a 4.0 scale (7.0 on a 10.0 scale) will be required to maintain good academic standing and to graduate.

A student's candidacy for a Graduate School degree can be terminated not only for insufficient grades, but also for such reasons as unsatisfactory progress toward a degree as defined by the Department of Government, inability to pass a comprehensive examination, failure to prepare or defend a thesis satisfactorily, and violation of the time limits for completing degrees.

For further information on these points, the students should consult the Graduate School Catalogue. The Graduate School, in consultation with the Department of Government, will determine all actions for termination on these and other possible grounds.